Abstract

Abstract:

This article investigates documentary films in which real-world sound captured from the location shoot has been treated more creatively than the captured image, in particular, instances when real-world noises pass freely between sound and musical composition. I call this process the sonic elongation of sound from image, and of music from sound. This blurring helps the soundtrack to keep one foot in the image, thus allowing the film to retain a loose grip on the traditional nonfiction aesthetic. With reference to several recent documentary feature films, I argue that such moments rely on a confusion between hearing and listening.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2578-4919
Print ISSN
2578-4900
Pages
pp. 88-113
Launched on MUSE
2020-01-30
Open Access
No
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