Abstract

Abstract:

This essay traces the evolution of Ronald Dore's scholarship, and his changing relationship with Japan, through four phases: discovering Japan, Japan as a comparative reference point, Japan as a source of policy inspiration, and disillusionment. In doing so, it highlights Dore's willingness to question received wisdom through careful empirical or historical observation, his sophisticated use of comparison, the importance of time and change in his conceptual frameworks, and his belief that academics should be engaged in making the world a better place. These qualities can be a source of inspiration to Japan studies and social science scholars today.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1549-4721
Print ISSN
0095-6848
Pages
pp. 91-111
Launched on MUSE
2020-01-28
Open Access
No
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