Abstract

Abstract:

This article critically outlines the discursive construction of racial and ethnic identities in Sudan and South Sudan, arguing its legacy is essential to understand the entanglement of state-formation, nationalism, citizenship, and political violence in both countries. Race and ethnicity were central to the colonial, nationalist, and postcolonial projects of inventing the "North" and the "South" as self-contained entities, and the politicization of race and ethnicity after independence is largely a product of "Orientalizing" cultural differences through colonial administrative rules and postcolonial policies.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1940-3461
Print ISSN
0026-3141
Pages
pp. 591-604
Launched on MUSE
2020-01-10
Open Access
No
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