Abstract

Abstract:

Compared to his peers, Anselm might be classified as an author with little interest in creation. He writes no hexameron and only rarely speculates explicitly on God's fashioning of the material world. However, on closer examination, his theological conception of creation proves absolutely vital to his thought as a whole. Properly understood, Anselm's understanding of creation as an object of aesthetic contemplation, a beautiful, ordered, and harmonious union that discloses its creator to creatures is central to his theological outlook and the means by which he both arrives at and communicates that outlook. The investigation into this aesthetic world-picture undertaken here, therefore, reveals the fundamental unity between Anselm's picture of creation, his portrait of our individual salvation, his reasoning, his authorial method, and, indeed, every other aspect of his thought.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1545-3367
Print ISSN
2689-6230
Pages
pp. 51-68
Launched on MUSE
2019-12-27
Open Access
No
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