Abstract

Abstract:

The paper discusses how a 'national game' ('jeu national') of the French Revolution can be regarded as a re-enactment of religion and may help to establish a new religious form. Based on Rousseau's theory of the Contrat Social, the paper examines the so-called Jeu de l'ole (Game of the Goose) as a revolution game by analysing its semiotic and performative character. It argues that the popular Game of the Goose, which was adapted by the printer Basset in 1791, serves as an early mass medium to educate and manipulate the players by putting the events that led to the Revolution in a teleological order, and stages the French Revolution as a Salvation History.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2196-3517
Print ISSN
0930-5874
Pages
pp. 141-161
Launched on MUSE
2019-12-20
Open Access
No
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