Abstract

Abstract:

Conscious objects, independent body parts, and ambiguously located feelings recur throughout George Eliot’s Silas Marner. Exploring what it might be like for a body to think, act, and feel of its own accord, George Eliot draws on George Henry Lewes’s theory of double-aspect monism to envision sensation and habit as vehicles for expansion and transformation beyond the boundaries of the body. George Eliot’s exploration of the value of the habitual and mechanical points to her investment in exploring embodied forms of experience and connection rather than interpersonal sympathy.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1522-9270
Print ISSN
0039-3657
Pages
pp. 873-891
Launched on MUSE
2019-12-04
Open Access
No
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