Abstract

Abstract:

This article begins when, in the first installment of Charles Dickens’s Bleak House, Lady Dedlock faints at the sight of some handwriting on a legal document: the personal character of her former lover defiantly haunts the law hand he learned as a legal copyist. This tension between personal character and professional handwriting encapsulates midcentury copyright debates in which the moral rights of a personalized model of authorship competed with the trade interests of British publishing. The novel’s representation of this curious handwriting, however, materializes quite literally in the second installment: in the British publication in parts, Bradbury and Evans reproduce this intriguing hand in a letter whose exotic typeface reflects the creative machinery of a booming print industry.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1522-9270
Print ISSN
0039-3657
Pages
pp. 813-853
Launched on MUSE
2019-12-04
Open Access
No
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