Abstract

Abstract:

In the first part of 'The Glass of Pure Water' Hugh MacDiarmid introduces three unrelated themes which were close to his interests at the time of writing and represent perfection – the glass, God (or 'God' as a symbol), and the variety of manual signs. In the second half MacDiarmid invokes and combines these themes as precepts for the betterment of the lives of millions of men and women. He then asserts the anarchism which is his final ideal and of which communism is only 'a necessary and indispensable stage'. (Lucky Poet, Methuen, 1943, 67) In the last six lines MacDiarmid returns to the existing situation which has been the subject of his poem.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2050-6678
Print ISSN
1756-5634
Pages
pp. 157-164
Launched on MUSE
2019-11-30
Open Access
No
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