Abstract

Abstract:

In his last years, Mathew Carey (1760–1839), the disabled Irish Catholic immigrant who rose from anonymous poverty to become early America's most prominent publisher and a significant commentator on political economy, began a charitable crusade for the nation's white female working poor. Admonishing Christian republicans to love them with non-judgmental compassion, Carey's benevolence provides a nuanced view of how the Gospel's commission to care for abused and neglected outsiders was enacted in early nineteenth-century America and broadens our understanding of the religious fervor of the Second Great Awakening as being more than a movement defined solely by Protestant revivalists.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1534-0708
Print ISSN
0008-8080
Pages
pp. 480-502
Launched on MUSE
2019-11-15
Open Access
No
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