Abstract

Abstract:

Reception theory holds that close analysis of chronologically later literature has the potential to shape the interpretation of earlier works. This paper investigates the way in which Seneca's treatment of the House of Atreus in Thyestes suggests a new reading of Aeschylus's Agamemnon. I show that both plays reiterate a pattern of capitulation that can be traced throughout the generations of the family they describe. The clear causal connection between two such capitulation scenes in Thyestes helps us to understand Agamemnon's reluctant agreement to sacrifice Iphigenia as contributing to his decision to yield to Clytemnestra in the so-called 'tapestry scene.'

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
2328-5265
Print ISSN
0363-1923
Pages
pp. 1-24
Launched on MUSE
2019-11-14
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.