Abstract

Abstract:

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how mentor and resident teachers, involved in a clinically-rich teacher preparation program, resisted dominant discourses surrounding "challenging" behavior for students with disabilities as they described more humanistic and critically constructivist approaches. Although these teachers operated within, and sometimes reinforced, deficit discourses about urban schools and special education, they also resisted the dominant ideologies. It is this language of resistance we wish to explore. Mentor and resident educators we interviewed deconstructed common understandings of behavior as something done to them by students and repositioned behavior as relational and communicative. The overall goal of the paper is to discuss how these practicing teachers took up alternative understandings of "challenging" behavior, and the humanistic and critically constructive supports and strategies they implemented in one urban secondary school.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1534-5157
Print ISSN
0018-1498
Pages
pp. 297-317
Launched on MUSE
2019-11-11
Open Access
No
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