Abstract

Abstract:

Unlike many modernists, W. H. Auden consistently esteemed Milton’s poetry. Moreover, he often was stimulated by Milton’s antipathetic cultural legacy, which, in the 1930s, he identified with the rise of the National Socialists. This identification, most clearly made in New Year Letter (1940) and Letter to Lord Byron (1936), also informs one of Auden’s most well-known poems, “Lay Your Sleeping Head, My Love” (sometimes called “Lullaby”) (January 1937). That poem carefully rewrites Milton’s notions of love and religion, especially as they appear in “On Time,” to accord with Auden’s sense of his own time.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2056-5666
Print ISSN
0148-3331
Pages
pp. 414-437
Launched on MUSE
2020-02-04
Open Access
No
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