Abstract

Abstract:

I examine political cartoons from two satirical journals (Kladderadatsch and Simplicissimus) from 1914 to 1918 as evidence of German anxiety about the role of the United States in World War I and in the postwar international order. Reflecting prewar debates surrounding the "American danger," cartoonists from Kladderadatsch and Simplicissimus mobilized tropes from Wilhelmine culture to make sense of America's rapprochement with the Entente, America's entry into the war, and, finally, its ascension as a leading global power by 1918. German anxiety manifested itself in the numerous depictions of the United States and Woodrow Wilson over the course of the war.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2164-8646
Print ISSN
0149-7952
Pages
pp. 469-497
Launched on MUSE
2019-11-11
Open Access
No
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