Abstract

Abstract:

Camus is defined by many as an absurdist philosopher of revolt. The Plague, however, shows him working rigorously through a well-known division between ancient (Aristotelian) and modern (Kantian) ethics concerning the relation of reason, feeling, and happiness. Kant and Aristotle would agree, however, in their judgment of many characters and actions in The Plague: the novel provides realistic insights into a philosophical agreement between these supposed oppositions. In particular, both philosophers would agree concerning the relative goodness and relative happiness of Joseph Grand and Raymond Rambert. The illustration of this agreement proves Camus is valorizing a traditional ethic.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-329X
Print ISSN
0190-0013
Pages
pp. 350-368
Launched on MUSE
2019-10-29
Open Access
No
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