Abstract

Abstract:

This article examines the contemporary phenomenon of fiction and film about Holocaust survivors suffering from dementia. Earlier examples of this kind use dementia to explore the interior states of survivor guilt and the suppression of painful memories. By contrast, twenty-first-century representations convey the passing on of Holocaust memory to the next generation. These individuals, in the role of offspring or carers, act as the investigators and inheritors of a history that either has vanished from the survivor's memory or appears in the present as if it were still taking place. Such works are expressive of cultural anxiety at the vanishing of the generation of eyewitnesses to the events of the Holocaust yet also act to defuse the unwelcome lessons such witnesses might impart.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
2573-3575
Print ISSN
0013-8282
Pages
pp. 114-126
Launched on MUSE
2019-10-23
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.