Abstract

Abstract:

Milly Bloom, James Joyce's "Photo girl" in Ulysses (1922), has typically been read by critics as a whimsical and overtly-sexualized figure, despite the more progressive aspects of her role in the photographic industry. In Ulysses, photography is depicted as a hereditary pursuit, as when Joyce describes Leopold Bloom as thinking of his daughter, "Now photography. Poor papa's daguerreotype atelier he told me of. Hereditary taste" (U 8 173-74). Joyce's relationship with his daughter, Lucia, was frequently mediated by photography. In 1935, he purchased a new camera for Lucia after encouraging her to pursue this medium. In re-reading Milly's role via George Eastman's Kodak Girl, and the emergence of Irish and Triestine visual culture, new light is shed on the relationship between female photography and familial duty.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1464
Print ISSN
0022-281X
Pages
pp. 39-53
Launched on MUSE
2019-10-18
Open Access
No
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