Abstract

ABSTRACT:

Geoffrey Scott’s influential book The Architecture of Humanism has become an irrevocable part of the architectural canon. The origin of Scott’s ideas and their theoretical framework can be traced to Bernard Berenson’s little-known essay “A Word for Renaissance Churches.” This article will delineate a line of influence from Scott’s own mentor to the subsidiary authors who disseminated his theories throughout modern architecture over the course of a century. Though it has always been placed within the classical camp this article will, for the first time, underscore its influence within the modernist field of thought before and after World War II.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-3222
Print ISSN
0022-5037
Pages
pp. 597-619
Launched on MUSE
2019-10-11
Open Access
No
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