Abstract

abstract:

This article examines the concept of philanthrocapitalism in relation with a surge of political and cultural philanthropy in early nineteenth-century national movements that I deem gift-patriotism. I offer a survey of conceptual and rhetorical frames in economic anthropology (theories of gift) and political economy (the negotiation of self-interest and benevolence, and its relationship with charity) that have come to determine the understanding of philanthrocapitalism, and also look at novels by Charles Dickens, Eugene Sue, and Émile Zola as paradigmatic literary representations of related issues. Exploring crosscultural and transhistorical patterns, the article discusses how nineteenth-century feudal philanthropy was increasingly financialized and how, in turn, philanthrocapitalism contributes to a current refeudalization of the public sphere.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1528-4212
Print ISSN
0010-4132
Pages
pp. 469-486
Launched on MUSE
2019-10-09
Open Access
No
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