Abstract

Abstract:

After the assassination of Sheikh Said-Efendi of Chirkei in 2012, Russia's security and law enforcement organs returned to the coercive method of anti-terror war and began to repress the moderate (non-violent) Salafis in Dagestan. This change coincided with the governorship of Ramazan Abdulatipov, who intervened intensively in local politics. The Dagestan Muftiate, guided by the ethnic Avars and Shaikh Said-Efendi's disciples, exploited this situation to expand their influence to South Dagestan. Based on county-level fieldwork, we identified three patterns of interaction of secular and religious actors in South Dagestan: the strongholds of the local Sufi order guided by Sheikh Sirazhudin and Isamudin, which survived Abdulatipov's governorship; the equidistant local religious regimes, which Abdulatipov overturned on the pretext of their tolerance towards moderate Salafism; and (in Derbent County) a three-way battle between Sirazhudin-Isamudin's order, the Dagestan Muftiate, and the moderate Salafis in which the first continues to dominate.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1940-4603
Print ISSN
1074-6846
Pages
pp. 497-523
Launched on MUSE
2019-10-02
Open Access
No
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