Abstract

Abstract:

In this article, I review Philosophy Comes to Dinner, examining some of its persistent metaethical issues, especially some potentially controversial assumptions made by the authors and the tendency found in some to treat thought experiments as empirical experiments. The book covers arguments for different diets, the causal efficacy argument (i.e., the argument that individual food choices do not change societal food practices), feminist food ethics, harms of the food system, locavorism, and other topics. The causal efficacy argument, while not a part of all chapters in the book, is its focus, with authors arguing for and against it, and for and against various interpretations of its ethical consequences.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2160-1267
Print ISSN
2156-5414
Pages
pp. 212-219
Launched on MUSE
2019-09-19
Open Access
No
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