Abstract

abstract:

This article examines two dramas that use historical representations of witchcraft and work from original sources as a starting point: The Witch of Edmonton by Rowley, Dekker, and Ford (1621) and Witchcraft by Joanna Baillie (1836). Whilst the majority of those convicted of witchcraft in the early modern period were women, finding a female voice in historical sources is difficult. What is striking about these plays therefore, is the prominent voice allocated to the witch figures on stage. This not only presents a challenge to the control of the official narratives but draws attention to the social mechanisms at work in the conviction of a witch. The main argument is that the plays address an absence in the source materials; by presenting what can be termed as "missing evidence" through the voice of the witch, the plays contribute to the debate on witchcraft and force the audience to judge anew.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
2161-2188
Print ISSN
2161-2196
Pages
pp. 202-230
Launched on MUSE
2019-09-13
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.