Abstract

ABSTRACT:

Periodical studies has largely ignored the Colored American Magazine's engagement with mainstream print culture. Studies of Atlantic-group periodicals give little attention to the Colored American, while scholarship on the Colored American privileges the struggle between Pauline Hopkins and the Tuskegee Machine as a context for interpreting the magazine's ideological engagements. This essay seeks to correct this state of the field, arguing that in her novel Hagar's Daughter and other contributions to the Colored American, Hopkins battled historical revisionism concerning slavery, the Civil War and Reconstruction promoted by the Atlantic Monthly and its peers in the name of national reunion, as well as challenged the aesthetic regime of Howellsian realism in which reunionist ideology was encoded.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1548-4238
Print ISSN
1054-7479
Pages
pp. 135-162
Launched on MUSE
2019-09-04
Open Access
No
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