Abstract

Abstract:

The seeming permanence of the Berlin Wall and the spaces it separated during the Cold War placed unique demands on artistic mediations of the city's material, geopolitical, and social opposition. This article assembles a set of literary and cinematic narratives by Peter Schneider, Thomas Brasch, Helke Sander, and Christa Wolf to examine aesthetic forms as emergent responses to restrictions and enclosures west and east of the Wall. Contributing to scholarship on literature and cinema's interaction with space in the Cold War, my comparative analyses of their works evaluate artistic strategies and narrative techniques as elements of an aesthetic of cognitive mapping. I also highlight the significance of such an aesthetic for the prospects of human beings' orientation in the wake of the Cold War's passage.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1911-026X
Print ISSN
0037-1939
Pages
pp. 266-295
Launched on MUSE
2019-08-28
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.