Abstract

Abstract:

This essay presses the boundaries of autobiography to the field of urban studies. Fay Afaf Kanafani's Nadia, Captive of Hope: Memoir of an Arab Woman (1999) engages in the poetics and politics of the city. Kanafani's story of her multiple displacements and dislocations is positioned in the flow of urban experiences. The text offers a montage of self and nation, and blurs the lines between the private and the public. This essay explores the archaeological, as well as the cartographic qualities of Kanafani's work. While it reads the memoir as a metaphorical practice of autogeography, it draws on anthropological geography to investigate two major images related to urban spaces: the divided city and the gendered city.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1456
Print ISSN
0162-4962
Pages
pp. 293-310
Launched on MUSE
2019-08-27
Open Access
No
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