Abstract

ABSTRACT:

This article argues that Aristophanes' use of paratragedy and paraepic helps define Philocleon's and Bdelycleon's pointedly opposing views of themselves and their household. Bdelycleon conceives of his household as his property that he needs to protect, keeping his father, who the play likens to a female tragic heroine, safely guarded inside. Philocleon, by contrast, sees himself as a masculine epic hero, and invites us to consider whether the head of his household is despotic and anti-democratic, like a Trojan (Eastern) king or a Cyclops.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1558-9234
Print ISSN
0009-8418
Pages
pp. 253-278
Launched on MUSE
2019-08-21
Open Access
No
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