Abstract

Abstract:

In 1920, a new Buddhist organization was formed to build a bridge between the Korean and Japanese Buddhist communities in colonial Korea. With support from the colonial government, the Association of Korean Buddhism (Chōsen Bukkyōdan) created a nationwide network, publications, large-scale public events, and missionary initiatives. As this association potentially undermined the established, indigenous leadership of the Korean Buddhist community, Korean Buddhist leaders reacted by making major changes in their own institution. This article reveals that the association, rendered by the historiography of colonial Korean Buddhism as ineffective and irrelevant, served as a major catalyst in the modern transformation of Korean Buddhism.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1549-4721
Print ISSN
0095-6848
Pages
pp. 339-368
Launched on MUSE
2019-08-13
Open Access
No
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