Abstract

Abstract:

In Out of the House of Bondage: The Transformation of the Plantation Household and Terror in the Heart of Freedom: Citizenship, Sexual Violence, and the Meaning of Race in the Postemancipation South, Thavolia Glymph and Hannah Rosen not only illustrate the gruesome violence inflicted onto black women's bodies, but these historians also show the ways that black women resisted such violence and degradation, re-configuring the definition of citizenship and respectable womanhood. Whereas the prevailing ideology of nineteenth-century conceptions of blackness and womanhood sought to remove, often forcibly, black women from their claim to respectability, virtue, autonomy, and voice, Glymph and Rosen highlight the immense struggles yet tenacious persistence of black women in the American South who imagined an identity for themselves outside of the racist and sexist ideology under which they lived and laboured. When we place Erica Armstrong Dunbar's book A Fragile Freedom: African American Women and Emancipation in the Antebellum City in conversation with Glymph's and Rosen's texts, we observe a more nuanced approach to the study of African American women's experience with and transgression from nineteenth-century American racial conventions. Dunbar charts the social mobility and individual agency of African American women in Philadelphia during the decades preceding the Civil War.

Résumé:

Dans Out of the House of Bondage: The Transformation of the Plantation Household et Terror in the Heart of Freedom: Citizenship, Sexual Violence, and the Meaning of Race in the Postemancipation South, non seulement Thavolia Glymph et Hannah Rosen illustrent la violence horrible infligée aux corps des femmes noires, mais ces historiennes montrent aussi les manières dont les femmes noires ont résisté de telles violences et dégradations, repensant la définition de citoyenneté et de féminité respectable. Alors que l'idéologie dominante des conceptions du XIXe siècle de « noir » et de « féminité » tente de retirer, souvent avec force, les femmes noires de leurs revendications de respectabilité, de vertu, d'autonomie et de voix, Glymph et Rosen mettent l'accent sur les luttes immenses, mais tenaces, des femmes noires dans le Sud des États-Unis, lesquelles se sont imaginées une identité à l'extérieur de l'idéologie raciste et sexiste dans laquelle elles vivaient et travaillaient. Lorsque nous mettons le livre d'Erica Armstrong Dunbar, A Fragile Freedom: African American Women and Emancipation in the Antebellum City, en conversation avec les textes de Glymph et de Rosen, nous observons une approche plus nuancée de l'étude de l'expérience des femmes afro-américaines en matière de transgression des conventions raciales américaines du XIXe siècle. Dunbar trace la mobilité sociale et la capacité individuelle d'agir des femmes afro-américaines de la Philadelphie au cours des décennies précédant la Guerre de Sécession.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1710-114X
Print ISSN
0007-7720
Pages
pp. 226-235
Launched on MUSE
2019-08-10
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.