Abstract

Abstract:

Liberals claim that globalization has led to fragmentation and decentralized networks of power relations. This does not explain how states increasingly "weaponize interdependence" by leveraging global networks of informational and financial exchange for strategic advantage. The theoretical literature on network topography shows how standard models predict that many networks grow asymmetrically so that some nodes are far more connected than others. This model nicely describes several key global economic networks, centering on the United States and a few other states. Highly asymmetric networks allow states with (1) effective jurisdiction over the central economic nodes and (2) appropriate domestic institutions and norms to weaponize these structural advantages for coercive ends. In particular, two mechanisms can be identified. First, states can employ the "panopticon effect" to gather strategically valuable information. Second, they can employ the "chokepoint effect" to deny network access to adversaries. Tests of the plausibility of these arguments across two extended case studies that provide variation both in the extent of U.S. jurisdiction and in the presence of domestic institutions—the SWIFT financial messaging system and the internet—confirm the framework's expectations. A better understanding of the policy implications of the use and potential overuse of these tools, as well as the response strategies of targeted states, will recast scholarly debates on the relationship between economic globalization and state coercion.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1531-4804
Print ISSN
0162-2889
Pages
pp. 42-79
Launched on MUSE
2019-08-05
Open Access
No
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