Abstract

Abstract:

Like the notes in many eighteenth- and nineteenth-century editions of English poetry, William Tooke’s explanatory annotations to the Poetical Works of Charles Churchill (1804) have been dismissed as inaccurate and irrelevant. Yet in drawing the bulk of his notes from newspapers and other popular print ephemera of Churchill’s lifetime (1732–64), Tooke (1777–1863) reveals both how Churchill fashioned his satires to appeal to periodical readers and how Churchill’s popularity depended on such readers seeking false or exaggerated rumors of celebrity scandal. In addition, by devaluing accuracy, authenticity, and relevance in their own selection of sources, Tooke’s notes raise questions about the place of accuracy and relevance in modern explanatory editing, suggesting that the emphasis on accuracy can sometimes lead to historically inaccurate readings.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1933-7418
Print ISSN
1559-2936
Pages
pp. 42-69
Launched on MUSE
2019-07-25
Open Access
No
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