Abstract

Abstract:

In this brief excerpt from a forthcoming translation of L'Afrique et ses fantômes (2015) and Singe de Kafka (2008), Seloua Luste Boulbina shows how French opposition to the Islamic hijab, as described by Fanon, mirrored British opposition to the Indian practice of sati by claiming to defend women while really defending the interests of European men. This made it difficult, if not impossible, for women to define and assert interests of their own, apart from the perspectives imposed by politically opposed groups of men. Fanon recognized this complex silence. But Fanon also failed to read the perspective motivating the writings of fellow Martinican author, Mayotte Capécia (Lucette Ceranus Combette), which prevented him from seeing any independence in women's capacity for interracial love and prevented him from giving a more complex psychological and political meaning to mixed ancestry.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
2155-0905
Print ISSN
2155-0891
Pages
pp. 111-126
Launched on MUSE
2019-07-20
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.