Abstract

Abstract:

Youth with disabilities are significantly overrepresented in the juvenile justice system, yet they are generally less successful post-release in the domains of recidivism, school completion, and employment as compared to their nondisabled peers. The purpose of this literature review is to identify empirical transition practices that benefit youth with disabilities, who are at a high risk of incarceration and school dropout. Three types of practices were identified as effective in varying degrees on rates of recidivism and community engagement: the use of transition specialists, education and employment support, and mental health services. The implications for practice include extending transition services post-release, coordinating with outside agencies, and developing individualized programming for youth with disabilities based on their specific needs.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1934-8924
Print ISSN
0748-8491
Pages
pp. 409-438
Launched on MUSE
2019-07-13
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Archived
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