Abstract

Abstract:

This article explores how aesthetic and rhetorical devices materialize race in the visual field. It focuses on portraits of Zamor, a young slave who grew up at the court of Louis XV, and on Mme de Duras’s novella Ourika. Examining the formal devices through which blackness was sutured onto both Ourika’s and Zamor’s bodies, this article challenges the notion that race is stable reality that preexists aesthetic depiction. Through the metaphor of the ghost, I suggest that Zamor’s and Ourika’s blackness works as a “visible invisibility,” emerging through the perception of the immaterial and the absent.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1931-0234
Print ISSN
0014-0767
Pages
pp. 56-71
Launched on MUSE
2019-06-28
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.