Abstract

abstract:

This article examines women's rage in response to rape, arguing that Chaucer depicts the possibilities of female rage and collective action in his Legend of Philomela. This article situates Chaucer's portrayal of sisterly anger in the context of the Philomela narrative in John Gower's Confessio Amantis and Ovid's Metamorphoses. It links this discussion of sisterhood, anger, and survival in medieval texts to contemporary examples of victim-survivors who use similar tactics to respond to their assaults and to challenge the cultural conditions that made them possible.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1528-4204
Print ISSN
0009-2002
Pages
pp. 253-269
Launched on MUSE
2019-06-22
Open Access
No
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