Abstract

Abstract:

From the famous 1810 Hellespont feat to the 1818 Lido-Grand Canal race, Byron’s prowess as a sea-swimmer and his talent for relating these epic exploits in vibrant prose remains unchallenged, as his famous letter vindicating his Leander swim and the Venice race, printed in The London Magazine in April 1821, attests. Equally compelling are his poetic depictions of swimmers—Manfred’s and Jacopo Foscari’s childhood memories, Childe Harold’s Ocean stanzas, The Island’s seascape. Perhaps most significant, however, is the pervading presence of marine metaphors and tropes that navigate the entirety of Byron’s oeuvre, and reveal an idiosyncratic poetics. This essay will address the intricate, transgressive, playful ways in which Byron’s life-long relationship with the sea, and swimming, is reflected in his writing.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1757-0263
Print ISSN
0301-7257
Pages
pp. 5-16
Launched on MUSE
2019-06-27
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.