Abstract

Abstract:

Marston's Antonio's Revenge is a self-reflexive tragedy with characters who speak and act like characters familiar with the conventions of Elizabethan revenge plays. This article argues that Marston's use of metatheatricality allegorizes the competitive nature of commercial theatres. As Marston's characters seek to emulate and surpass their theatrical models, revenge becomes a medium for aesthetic achievement, a show-case for acting and rhetorical skill. The play expands the theatrum mundi trope, imagining the world not as a single stage but as a marketplace of rival stages wherein playwrights vie for applause and seek recognition for their theatrical brilliance.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2293-7609
Print ISSN
1206-9078
Pages
pp. 93-117
Launched on MUSE
2019-07-08
Open Access
No
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