Abstract

Abstract:

Spanish imperial law empowered enslaved men and women to accuse slaveholders of abuse and have those complaints investigated and adjudicated by colonial magistrates. This article explores how enslaved women in eighteenth-century Peru began to articulate visions of slavery, fair treatment, and abuse as profoundly gendered in accusing their owners of abuse and how such articulations became reflected in imperial law. Women (and their advocates) advanced such claims of gendered abuse in terms of violations of colonial gendered notions of labor and colonial codes of sexual honor and as a result of sexual violence.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-2036
Print ISSN
1042-7961
Pages
pp. 57-79
Launched on MUSE
2019-06-14
Open Access
No
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