Abstract

Abstract:

This paper examines forty-one covers of Yoga Journal magazine from 1975 to 2016. Using qualitative visual and linguist frame analysis of magazine covers, this project critically examines how yoga representations have evolved from a mental discipline to a commercialized form of exercise. Themes of religion, art, exercise, spiritual connection, and (male Indian) expertise were prominent cover displays from the 1970s through the 1990s. However, in the 2000s, thin young white female bodies came to signify the practice of yoga, anchored to hegemonic notions of femininity displayed on the covers in objectified and commercialized forms. Implications for public-health messaging, political-economic pressures on magazines, and mainstream perceptions of yoga are discussed.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2576-7895
Print ISSN
2576-7887
Pages
pp. 75-103
Launched on MUSE
2019-05-21
Open Access
No
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