Abstract

Abstract:

In fourteenth-century France, Charles V's official programs of translations into French have typically been considered the instrument of a royal political agenda and concepts of translatio as a transfer of power from the clerical milieu to the lay court. However, this essay focuses on the works of one of the king's preeminent translators Nicole Oresme, more from the cultural standpoint of the translator than the king's political one. Oresme's scholastic and cultural background helps understanding how translating was an all-encompassing complex intellectual process for him and that any of the political stands that arose from his process reflected personal philosophical beliefs and worldview.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
2162-9552
Print ISSN
2162-9544
Pages
pp. 139-160
Launched on MUSE
2019-05-16
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.