Abstract

Abstract:

This article examines the interplay of word and image in two depictions of torture during the Algerian War: Muriel (Alain Resnais, 1963) and The Battle of Algiers (Gillo Pontecorvo, 1966). While Resnais offers the spectator a desynchronized sound-image sequence wherein torture is narrated verbally, Pontecorvo's depiction shuns words, instead offering soft-focus close-ups and soaring classical overtures. Drawing on Jacques Rancière's work on history, cinema, and the idea of the unrepresentable, this article argues that the director's choice of privileging either the verbal or the visual illuminates deeper concerns around gender, discursive violence, and the cinematic representation of the inhuman.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2578-4919
Print ISSN
2578-4900
Pages
pp. 26-48
Launched on MUSE
2019-05-14
Open Access
No
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