Abstract

ABSTRACT:

This article focuses on some of the intertextual poems and stories that Edgar Allan Poe and Frances Sargent Osgood published in the Broadway Journal and Graham's Magazine throughout 1845 and 1846, in a literary conversation that hinted broadly at romantic relationship. The works of the Poe-Osgood exchange—which I construe to include a number of well-known stories reprinted during the same period—are self-conscious about their transformation of supposed biography into art for mass consumption. This self-consciousness is, I argue, publicly enacted through the Pygmalion trope. In texts that center on the transformation of a work of art into life—or its reversal, the transformation of a living being into art—Poe and Osgood construct a public literary exchange that considers the era's blurring of the lines between literary celebrity, biographical reality, and art.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1754-6095
Print ISSN
1947-4644
Pages
pp. 22-43
Launched on MUSE
2019-05-08
Open Access
No
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