Abstract

Abstract:

In Abidjan, the largest city of Côte d'Ivoire, woro-woros are artisanal private taxis that cater to the needs of large parts of the urban population, the organization of which takes place in gares routières, improvised roadside stations. While this type of transport has existed since colonial times, it has grown considerably since the 1980s. The rise of the woro-woro industry is often attributed to the economic and political crises of Côte d'Ivoire, in particular to the presumed regulatory vacuum that followed the disintegration of state-run public transport provisions. Without denying the relevance of politico-economic factors, this article provides an alternative explanation of the proliferation of woro-woro services and gares by attending to the role that decentralization, competition, and struggles over local administrative control played in establishing woroworos as Abidjan's main mode of public transport.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-1978
Print ISSN
0001-9887
Pages
pp. 22-33
Launched on MUSE
2019-05-04
Open Access
No
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