Abstract

ABSTRACT:

This paper reviews the empirical literature on international spillovers and contagion. Theoretical models of spillover and contagion imply that the reduced-form observable variables suffer from two possible sources of bias: endogeneity and omitted variables. These econometric problems, in combination with the heteroskedasticity that plagues the data, produce time-varying biases. Several empirical methodologies are evaluated from this perspective: nonparametric techniques, such as correlations and principal components; and parametric methods, such as OLS, VAR, event studies, ARCH, and nonlinear regressions. The paper concludes that there is no single technique that can solve the full-fledged problem and discusses three methodologies that can partially address some of the questions in the literature.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1533-6239
Print ISSN
1529-7470
Pages
pp. 69-99
Launched on MUSE
2019-04-30
Open Access
No
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