Abstract

Abstract:

Nora Okja Keller's Comfort Woman (1997) prioritizes the point of view of women to discuss the aftermath of war. The novel is centered on a mother-daughter relationship and scholars of Asian American literary studies often interpret the daughter's story line as a gendered legacy in which she inevitably inherits her mother's history of sexual traumas. In this article, I consider the role of queerness threaded throughout the novel's representations of World War II military outposts and Korean "comfort women," to argue that Korean American intergenerational models contain multiple sexualities as a result of Japanese colonialism and U.S. militarization.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1934-1520
Print ISSN
0732-1562
Pages
pp. 193-208
Launched on MUSE
2019-04-19
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.