Abstract

abstract:

This article examines how Pittsburgh's Manchester neighborhood, a historic African American community located on the city's North Side, fought against macroeconomic forces and internal challenges to stabilize its population, improve its physical environment, and stimulate private investment over the course of fifty years, from 1964 through 2014. Manchester's transformation was the product of three key factors: (1) capacity in the form of strong, sustained leadership; (2) fealty to a long-term vision of the neighborhood as a stable and upwardly mobile African American community; and (3) control over land and resources, especially the involvement of the private sector, to bring the vision to life. These elements—leadership, vision, and resources—separated Manchester from other black neighborhoods as it became a national model for community revitalization over the course of fifty years.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2153-2109
Print ISSN
0031-4528
Pages
pp. 254-286
Launched on MUSE
2019-04-11
Open Access
No
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