Abstract

Abstract:

Background: Obesity is a national epidemic in the United States. Racial/ethnic minorities are disproportionately affected by this obesity epidemic. Hispanic adults have a higher prevalence of obesity compared to non-Hispanic White adults. Levels of engagement in healthy eating and physical activity have been found to be associated with obesity. Research suggests that culturally informed, person-centered factors may influence engagement in healthy eating and physical activity.

Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to examine the association between person-centered, modifiable variables (i.e., activation, empowerment, and self-praise) and health-promoting behaviors (i.e., healthy eating and physical activity) among a cross-sectional sample of predominantly overweight/obese Hispanic adults (N = 87) recruited from two Hispanic churches and their surrounding communities in the Bronx, New York.

Results: A series of hierarchical regressions revealed that empowerment and self-praise were significant and positively associated with greater levels of engagement in healthy eating. Additionally, self-praise was significant and positively associated with greater levels of engagement in physical activity.

Conclusions: The current findings suggest that these modifiable factors may be useful in informing intervention programs designed to improve healthy eating and physical activity among Hispanic adults.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1557-055X
Print ISSN
1557-0541
Pages
pp. 9-17
Launched on MUSE
2019-04-05
Open Access
No
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