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  • How Do You Draw a Frog?A Visual Conversation
  • Amy Fung-yi Lee (bio) and Kiran Chandra (bio)

I opened up this project to Kiran with a rather structured idea about process—a blind drawing game whose rules resembled Exquisite Corpse. When I work on my own, I usually work within boundaries that describe the images and methods I believe suit me. With Kiran, I started simply by putting pencil to paper next to a friend I know, who loves drawing as much as I do.

After beginning, I soon learned about Kiran's process. She expressed to me that she learns through doing. So we drew (and ate, and chatted). These pages came from that.

Neither of us would have done this on our own. We swapped drawings, reached over each other to find new materials, marked over each other's work, and tried weird imagery just to see what the other would do with it. We lost track. This collaboration forged an exploratory path. An unknown place. These pages feel laid bare to me. There are "mistakes" and vulnerabilities. I actually changed and found that I am willing to bring imagery unlike myself into my own work again. [End Page 457]

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When Amy asked me if I'd be interested in doing a drawing collaboration with her, I was immediately interested. Another set of marks, another hand and mind at work, another set of decisions, another sensibility at play? Another way to dissolve into drawing. Another dialogue that can occur on the page.

We gave each other prompts, such as which is your favorite Félix Gonzáles-Torres work? Or what is a drawing you made on repeat as a child?

We drew on memories and witnessed each other's first marks on encountering a blank page.

These pages to me feel like a true collaboration of mark making in which we are not so much individually present as we have made space and allowed for that something else to happen. Drawings that we found personally hilarious or poignant, as they would not have been made by either of us alone. [End Page 458]


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Amy Fung-yi Lee

amy fung-yi lee holds an MFA in visual art from Hunter College. Lee has participated in residencies nationally, most recently at the Hambidge Center in Georgia. She has exhibited her work in the Bay Area in California at venues such as Southern Exposure, and in New York City at venues including Flux Factory and Arario Gallery. Lee's work breaks down knowledge and meaning and instead creates movement and represents nature. She is interested in destabilizing contemporary societal structures that determine artistic value and works experimentally as a visual artist, an illustrator, and a singer-songwriter.

Kiran Chandra

kiran chandra is an interdisciplinary artist living and working in Brooklyn, New York. Her work is based in questions of language and meaning, and its conceptual vocabulary is informed by her BA in literature from Stephen's College in Delhi and her MFA from Hunter College. Having been born and raised in Kolkata, India, and schooled in the United States and having attended residencies in Italy, Sweden, and Mexico have instilled in her work a sensitivity to location, dislocation, praxis, temporality, power, and place. Kiran teaches art history and...

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Additional Information

ISSN
1938-8020
Print ISSN
1041-8385
Pages
pp. 457-473
Launched on MUSE
2019-03-28
Open Access
No
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