Abstract

Abstract:

Nannie Helen Burroughs's life-long stewardship of the National Training School for Women and Girls reveals how African American women's politics occupied multiple spheres—religious, international, educational, and domestic—simultaneously. Existing scholarship has under analyzed the relational and transnational nature of such politics as embodied by the school and reflected in her students' work abroad. Scholarly documentation of foreign mission work in the Woman's Auxiliary of the National Baptist Convention-USA and its rhetoric on black women and respectability has not been directly tied to the training school's global curriculum and activities, which included Burroughs's active participation in the Baptist World Alliance. As an educator, Burroughs fused Victorian gender norms, Pan-Africanism, feminist ideology, and Christian evangelism to position African and African American women as integral to the propagation of the Baptist faith and the goal of race/gender advancement.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-2036
Print ISSN
1042-7961
Pages
pp. 37-61
Launched on MUSE
2019-03-13
Open Access
No
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