Abstract

Abstract:

G.E. Lessing's rejection of human freedom is grounded in his understanding that only God can be absolutely free. It seems therefore reasonable to assume that Lessing abandoned any notion of free human will. Good deeds only arise from the realization that truths must be sought and used for human activity, which necessarily has to be unrestricted and free of any interference by others. This article examines the problem of freedom and evil, Lessing's apparent refusal to take part in the important discussion of this topic during the second half of the eighteenth century, and a juxtaposition of Lessing's and Kant's views on the matter.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1086-315X
Print ISSN
0013-2586
Pages
pp. 337-360
Launched on MUSE
2019-03-13
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.