Abstract

Abstract:

This essay argues that the reprint publishing economy of the early nineteenth-century United States, which is often figured as a benign purveyor of knowledge, was in fact energized by an aggressive capitalism distinguished by its radical devaluation of intellectual content. Examining transatlantic copyright debates in Poe's era, the essay argues that U.S. publishing capitalism was engaged in the transformation of cognitive assets into raw natural resources, what Jason W. Moore calls "cheap nature." Reimagining intellectual content as flowing water or wild grass, U.S. publishing capitalism was able to efface the work of authors as a cost inside text production.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6547
Print ISSN
0013-8304
Pages
pp. 189-222
Launched on MUSE
2019-03-06
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.