Abstract

Abstract:

The purpose of the paper is to examine the effectiveness of a six-week, culturally sensitive, church-based health-promotion intervention in increasing nutrition label health literacy and health-promoting behaviors (i.e., healthy eating, healthy drinking, and physical activity) and improving weight and blood pressure among Black adults. Study participants are a sample of 321 Black adult churchgoers (N = 321) who were divided between an intervention group (N = 172) and a wait-list control group (N = 149). The health-promotion intervention program is informed by Health Self-Empowerment Theory. At post-test, the participants in the intervention group demonstrated significantly greater increases in nutrition label health literacy, overall level of engagement in health-smart behaviors, and levels of engagement in two specific health-smart behaviors (i.e., healthy eating and healthy drinking) compared with those in the wait-list control group. Implications of these findings for future similar health-promotion intervention programs and research are discussed.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1548-6869
Print ISSN
1049-2089
Pages
pp. 80-101
Launched on MUSE
2019-03-01
Open Access
No
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